CASKETS AND COFFINS – THE MANY FACES OF HORROR – PART 3: WEREWOLVES and ANTHROMORPHS


In Case You Missed it – Check Out:
CASKETS AND COFFINS – THE MANY FACES OF HORROR – PART 1: MONSTERS
CASKETS AND COFFINS – THE MANY FACES OF HORROR – PART 2: VAMPIRES

WEREWOLVES & ANTHROMORPHS

Werewolves, also known as a Lycanthropes, are mythological or folkloric humans with the ability to shapeshift into a wolf or wolf-like creature, either purposely or after being placed under a curse or affliction (such as a scratch or a bite from another werewolf) and usually does so during a Full Moon. When in wolf form, the person that once was is gone and the beast that is has no recollection of its human life and often preys upon loved ones. A silver bullet or beheading have often been detailed as the only ways to stop a Werewolf. Anthromorphs have similar shape shifting abilities but are not limited to being a wolf but can take on the forms of other animals and creatures. Anthromorphs are generally depicted as being easier to incapacite than their Lycanthrope cousins.

Here are 3 Examples of Great Werewolf Movies:

An American Werewolf in London (1981)

AN AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LONDON (1981)
Directed by: John Landis
Produced by: George Folsey, Jr.
Jon Peters, Peter Guber
Screenplay by: John Landis
Starring: David Naughton, Jenny Agutter
Griffin Dunne, John Woodvine
Released: August 21, 1981
 
Synopsis from FANDANGO:

While wandering the English moors on vacation, college yanks David (David Naughton) and Jack (Griffin Dunne) happen upon a quaint pub with a mysterious patronage who warn them not to leave the road when walking after dark. Irreverent of such advice as characters in horror films always are, the two decide to find a short cut….David wakes up in the hospital with a nasty bite wound to his shoulder; the freshly deceased, and rapidly decomposing, Jack arrives soon after to deliver the grim news that, unless he commits suicide, David will become a werewolf when the moon is full. David dismisses the encounter as a hallucination, but all indicators point to lycanthrope; evenings of barking and bloodletting follow closely behind. While the story is thin and much of the tongue-in-cheek humor is overdone, there are plenty of genuine jolts thanks to makeup guru Rick Baker’s eye-popping special effects. The werewolf, resembling a cross between a bear and a wolverine, appears frighteningly real, and, given the fantastic premise, the gore is most convincing (although surprisingly and refreshingly scant). The hospital dream sequences are creative, and the scenes in which the werewolf runs rampant through downtown London are particularly good. In all, An American Werewolf in London is an original, atmospheric film that manages both to scare and amuse. While dismissed by most American critics upon its release, the film managed to secure a place in the annals of American cinema when Baker won an Academy Award for his amazing effects and creature designs.

Trailer:

Teen Wolf (1985)

TEEN WOLF(1985)
Directed by: Rod Daniel
Produced by: Mark Levinson, Scott M. Rosenfelt
George W. Perkins, Thomas Coleman, Michael Rosenblatt
Written by: Jeph Loeb, Matthew Weisman, Tim Hayes
Starring: Michael J. Fox, Lorie Griffin, James Hampton
Susan Ursitti, Jerry Levine, Mark Arnold, Jay Tarses, Scott Paulin
Released: August 23, 1985
 
Synopsis from IMDB:

Hairy Palms are just the start of Scott Howard’s problems. He already has girl problems, yearning for a fellow female classmate’s attention, his school basketball team can’t win any matches and rapidly reaching his late teens he feels too “normal”. However, with a full moon approaching Scott starts to feel different and when the “dog whistle” blows he realizes he’s not “normal” after all. The Teen Wolf is finally born, claws and “Bee Gee” style hairdo and to his surprise finds that being a werewolf is in the family blood, just that his father, Harold Howard, was hoping it might have “skipped a generation”. Ensuing pressure on the basketball front brings the Teen Wolf to the public’s attention and for a while he can do no wrong in the whole of the school’s eyes, in fact he doesn’t miss a shot! His best friend, Stiles, sees money making opportunities and even Pamela Wells, the teen temptress he longed to date, finally gives him something to howl about. Before long things take a turn and the Wolf’s persona takes a few knocks on and off court and his popularity is questioned. But the only person who knows that the real Scott should prevail is Boof, his childhood best friend.

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Trailer:

The Howling (1981)

THE HOWLING(1981)
Directed by: Joe Dante
Produced by: Michael Finnell, Jack Conrad
Screenplay by: John Sayles, Terence H. Winkless
Based on The Howling by Gary Brandner
Starring: Dee Wallace, Patrick Macnee, Dennis Dugan
Christopher Stone, Belinda Balaski
Released: April 10, 1981
 
Synopsis from ROTTEN TOMATOES:

Joe Dante directed this sleek, post-modernist horror film concerning the relationship between contemporary lycanthropy and pop psychology. Dee Wallace is Karen White, a driving but innocent television anchor woman who tries to scoop the competition by using herself as bait to capture roving psycho killer Eddie Quist (Robert Picardo). She agrees to meet Eddie in a run-down sex shop, but doesn’t realize her camera crew has lost contact with her. As they talk in a porno movie booth, Eddie undergoes a transformation that shocks Karen. The police arrive and kill Eddie, but Karen is so traumatized she blocks out memories of her encounter with Eddie. Searching for answers to what happened with Eddie, she consults with Dr. George Waggner (Patrick Macnee), who performed Eddie’s psychological profile. He recommends that Karen and her husband Bill (Christopher Stone) take time off and visit his health resort, The Colony. Once at The Colony, however, Karen is unable to relax. She is rattled by some of the other guests and is disturbed by the continuous howling she hears at night. Members of The Colony try to calm Karen’s fears by forming a search party, but they can find nothing unusual. Meanwhile, Bill meets Marsha (Elizabeth Brooks), who signals to Bill that she is attracted to him. Bill leaves Marsha, but walking back home to Karen, he is attacked and bitten by a wolf. Karen calls to tell her friend Terry (Belinda Balaski) the news. Terry immediately drops everything and heads to The Colony — she has been doing her own investigation of the Eddie Quist case and was told by the owner of an occult book store (Dick Miller) that Eddie may have been a werewolf. Suspecting that Bill may become a werewolf himself after his attack, she races to The Colony to rescue Karen. But Bill has already met Marsha during the height of the full moon. As they make passionate love in the forest, they both transform into wolves.

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Trailer:

CASKETS AND COFFINS – THE MANY FACES OF HORROR – PART 1: MONSTERS
CASKETS AND COFFINS – THE MANY FACES OF HORROR – PART 2: VAMPIRES

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